The past 10 months I spent at Elevate Healthcare Marketing have been everything I could have wanted in an internship. I learned a great deal from the people around me, developed new skills, worked my craft, and ultimately ended up landing my dream job in New York as a result of my time there.

Here are three things I learned during my time as an intern that I would encourage all future interns to embrace:

  1. If you’re able to work, work.

My internship started over the summer when I was not taking classes. Obviously, it became my primary focus and really my only obligation. After those six weeks, I made great strides, but was still looking for more. Thankfully, the folks at Elevate we’re still looking for help. We agreed on a new schedule for my hours during the school year so I could still come into the office in Blue Bell twice a week. My schedule got much busier, but it absolutely paid off in terms of continuing my growth as a copywriter. I’m glad I challenged and pushed myself to do the most and am more than happy with the results.

2.  Use the resources around you.

As an intern, every person you work with will more than likely have more industry experience than you. There’s no reason not to ask questions (when appropriate) and pick the brains of the people around you on why they do things in a certain manner or just how they go about their business overall. You are there to help, but also there to learn. I’ve yet to encounter someone professionally who didn’t match someone’s eagerness to learn with the willingness to teach. Be a sponge and try to absorb as much as you possibly can when you are afforded the opportunity.

3.  When the time comes, be sure to thank everyone, including yourself.

It is important for everyone to realize that individual success is often a result of a great team around you. No one gets to where they are without the help of others. Upon announcing I had accepted a full time offer elsewhere, I made a point to thank each person at Elevate individually for the specific help that they provided me. Making those thank you’s more personable and specific actually shows the person you appreciate how they helped you in a specific manner, which they will often recount. This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be thanking people along the way too for what they do for you. When I say you should be thanking yourself as well, I simply mean give yourself credit when credit is due. All the days when you didn’t feel 100% or you were booked to the nines with assignments, but you still went in to help and do your job anyway, that’s what you should be thanking yourself for. For pushing yourself and having long term success in mind over short term convenience. I think that gets lost in people sometimes, but is extremely important in reaching the ultimate feeling of satisfaction and fulfillment.