My name is Matthew Morrison and I work for Temple News. Friday, the fourth of April was no ordinary day. A few Temple news workers, including my self, were sitting on a train out of Hamburg NJ barreling down the tracks to the core of the Big Apple. Our Financial liaison MediaMate was hosting a conference for college newspapers they were associated with. Nine schools belonging to the northeastern part of the states had been invited to participate in this round table event. Taking Place in the Harvard building, we found ourselves in awe. Every room passed held towering bookshelves packed with spines bounding centuries of history, ideas and beliefs. Holding you captive in its timeless majesty. The room adorn with intricate detail work. Royal mahogany paneled walls Crowned with molding that would make a king envious. After being distracted by the building’s decadence we were immediately engaged with members from other universities newspapers. We all did the usual conversation dance. Some waltzed, some tangoed, and there were even a few who pulled the old high school awkward arm length apart sway. The dynamic in the room continued throughout our time there as speakers and questions mingled together in a bubble of ideas and experiences. By the end we all returned home with a little something more rolling around our mind, steering up views we had never looked at before. The real value of the trip wasn’t the lavish setting, the experienced speakers or the different points of view. It was learning to see those points of view and apply them to our own situations. That the value of information is stagnant to a situation if you can’t see it from the proper point of view to apply it. In our world of advertising this is a valuable skill to have when dealing with any aspect of our job. To see a clients view you can evaluate the work your company is producing and understand if they will approve or not, just as a small example. This may seem like a no brainer to some yet we rarely find individuals capable of imploring this skill on a regular bases.